White Street's award-winning Scottish Ale was made to be paired with all things grilled. And if you think the sweet caramel malts enhance the char flavors while you drink the Scottish with your ribs, wait until you cook with it!!

Here's our favorite Scottish sauce to slather on that next rack of ribs:

Scottish Sauce.JPG

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 White Street Scottish Ale six-pack

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter

  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped

  • 1 clove garlic, minced

  • 1/4 cup ketchup

  • 1/4 cup molasses

  • 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce

  • 3 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard

  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar (or more if you have a sweet tooth)

  • 1 teaspoon distilled white vinegar

  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (or a lot more if you like the heat!)

  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin

  • Salt to taste

  • Freshly ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS

Start by opening a bottle of White Street Scottish Ale and take a long sip. This will prepare your tastebuds for the flavor explosion you'll soon experience.

Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 2 minutes, then add the garlic and cook until the onion has softened, 4 to 6 minutes. Reduce the heat if the vegetables begin to brown too much.

Open a second bottle of Scottish to actually cook with. Add the beer and bring to a boil; cook until it has reduced to about 1/2 cup. Add the ketchup, molasses, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, brown sugar, vinegar, cumin, and red pepper flakes. Let it simmer down for about 10 minutes or until the sauce is thick enough to coat the back of your spoon.

Taste, and add salt, pepper, additional brown sugar, if needed; the sauce should be highly seasoned. Apply to your ribs in the last 20 minutes to glaze the meat perfectly without burning.

While it's glazing, go ahead and crack open a few more Scottish for yourself and for the friends and neighbors that have undoubtedly wandered over to see what smells so good on your grill.

Cheers!!

 

Adapted from "Raichlen on Ribs, Ribs, Outrageous Ribs," by Steve Raichlen (Workman, 2006)